What to do when marine wildlife need help?

Submitted by Michelle Barbieri, DVM


There are lots of ways that you can help Hawaii’s marine wildlife, both as an individual and if your clinic gets calls or inquiries. It may be completely normal for an animal (such as a green sea turtle or Hawaiian monk seal) to rest on the beach, but those sightings are informative even if the animal is safe and healthy. You can encourage clients to report sightings or concerns by calling the state-wide Marine Animal Stranding and Reporting Hotline at (888) 256-9840. This menu-based hotline will divert calls to the island- and wildlife-specific point of contact, and if the call comes in after hours, it will be checked first thing the next day, so always leave contact information for follow up questions. This is the best go-to contact number to keep at the front desk of your clinic or stored in your phone.

Many species (especially sea turtles and marine mammals) are protected by law. That means that even if you are a licensed, practicing, and well-intentioned veterinarian, conducting medical procedures on them requires specialized permits and expertise, so it should always be done by appropriately trained and permitted stranding response personnel. If your clinic gets a call about a marine animal in need, it is best to refer them directly to the Stranding Hotline for assistance. Please do not attempt to treat an animal yourself.

It is also important to give wildlife a safe distance, avoid approaching, touching, or otherwise disturbing them because rest is important to their biology, and they can be a danger to your safety. You can also help by advising clients to keep pet cats indoors, which will reduce the risk of disease spread, namely toxoplasmosis.

Between Jan-July 2020, 18 monk seal pups were born in the main Hawaiian Islands: 5 on Oʻahu, 11 on Molokaʻi, and 1 each on Kaua‘i and Hawaiʻi Island. Encountering female seals that are nursing their pups is a situation in which it is important to be especially cautious, as these seals in particular can be aggressive.

The Fishing Around Seals and Turtles program provides guidelines on how to fish safely around these animals and what to do if a fisherman accidentally hooks one while fishing. Again, if someone contacts you about an entangled or hooked animal please refer them to the stranding hotline.

If you suspect illegal or suspicious activity, it can be reported to: (a) the Hawaii DLNR Division of Conservation and Resources (DOCARE) hotline at (808) 643-DLNR, or preferably on the DLNRTip App for your mobile device; or (b) NOAA Office of Law Enforcement Hotline (800) 853-1964. The Stranding Hotline links to DOCARE as well.

For additional information contact: RespectWildlife@noaa.gov
For immediate assistance or to report marine wildlife emergencies call: 1-888-256-9840
If you are interested in having electronic materials with this information that you can print and post at your clinic, please contact Dr. Michelle Barbieri.

Microchip Regulation Update

On July 1, 2020, the City and County of Honolulu implemented mandatory microchip identification for cats and dogs over the age of four months. This replaces the City and County of Honolulu’s dog license tag requirement, but does not replace the requirement that cats allowed outdoors have visible identification. Any dog or cat without a microchip who is impounded by Hawaiian Humane Society or taken into custody by an animal rescue nonprofit must have a microchip implanted before release. The microchipping obligation does not apply to private individuals returning lost pets or to veterinary clinics, but we hope you will urge your clients to comply with the law. Clients with a new pet who is already microchipped should be informed that they have 30 days to update the pet’s microchip with their owner information.

In addition, the Hawaiian Humane Society will no longer be updating their microchip registry. Instead, they are recommending that veterinarians help pet owners register their information with the microchip manufacturer or with a free online database such as FoundAnimals.org. Pet owners who have microchips implanted by your clinic also have a legal obligation to register their contact information with an online registry within 30 days. Please do not send microchip information to the Hawaiian Humane Society at this time.

Another provision of the new law requires that any intact dog impounded as stray three times in a 12-month period must be spayed/neutered before the dog can be returned to its owner unless a licensed veterinarian finds the dog is medically unfit for sterilization.

Questions or comments may be directed to the Hawaiian Humane Society at info@hawaiianhumane.org or 356-2200.

Update from Hawaiian Humane Society

July 1 marked the implementation of the most significant overhaul of Oahu’s animal welfare ordinance in 25 years. It made changes in three major areas:

  • Stray animal handling
  • Pet identification
  • Routinely stray dogs

The pet identification provisions are expected to affect the greatest number of pet owners.

FAQs

What law has changed?
Revised Ordinance of Honolulu Chapter 7: Animals and Fowl

How did the rules change regarding stray animal holding?
Hawaiian Humane now has legal custody of any stray dog or cat with microchip identification after five days in its care, down from nine. Dogs wearing a current county license tag still must be held for a minimum of nine days. The kenneling fee for stray animals has increased to $10 per day from $2.50. There is still no kenneling charge for animals reclaimed within 24 hours. This is not a legal requirement, but Hawaiian Humane is urging pet owners who travel, particularly if they will not have email or cell phone access, to list their pet sitter or veterinarian as a secondary contact on their microchip registration in the event that their animal gets lost while they are away.

What are the new rules for pet identification?
All dogs and cats are now required to have microchip identification. Pet cats allowed outdoors are still required to have visible identification. That is highly recommended for dogs, as well, but not legally required.

What if you have a current dog license?
Owner information can still be updated with the City and County of Honolulu. No new dog licenses are being sold and licenses can no longer be renewed.

What about microchip registration?
Clinics that wish to upload microchip information should do so with the manufacturer’s database, not Hawaiian Humane. Hawaiian Humane is no longer maintaining a separate microchip database for Oahu and pet owners are no longer legally required to register their microchips with Hawaiian Humane. Under the new ordinance, pet owners who have microchips implanted have 30 days to register their contact information with the microchip manufacturer or a free online database. Similarly, they have 30 days to update any changes to their contact information or to transfer ownership of a pet.

What does the new law say about routine strays, or “frequent fliers”?
Any dog brought to Hawaiian Humane as stray three times in a 12-month period must be spayed/neutered before the dog can be returned to its owner, unless medically contraindicated. Sterilization services will be offered at the Community Spay/Neuter Center, but owners may request that Hawaiian Humane transfer a dog falling under this requirement to a private veterinary clinic upon confirmation of a spay/neuter appointment.

What do we do if someone brings us a lost pet?
Hawaiian Humane remains the official pet lost and found for Oahu. If you need help identifying the owner of a microchipped pet, call the admissions team at 356-2285.

In Remembrance – Dr. Jessica Massengale

Jessica Massengale, DVM

Dr. Jessica Claire Lee Massengale, 34, of Kaneohe, Hawaii, died peacefully on Thursday, July 9, 2020. She was born in Huntington, West Virginia, on May 18, 1986 to Roger and Debra Massengale and baptized as a child at First United Methodist Church, Paintsville, Kentucky.

A life-long learner, Jessi received her high school diploma in 2004 from Virginia Episcopal School in Lynchburg, Virginia, graduated in 2008 from Midway College with her Bachelor Degree in Equine Therapy and earned her Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine in 2014 from Auburn University. She was a dedicated and beloved doctor of animals at Haiku Veterinarian Clinic in Kaneohe. She loved all things pertaining to horses and rode on Equestrian teams for both Virginia Episcopal School and Midway College. She had an adventuresome spirit, was learning to kayak, and especially enjoyed hiking with her dogs.

In addition to her parents, she is survived by her sister, Sarah Anne and brother-in-law Mårten Waern, Stockholm, Sweden; maternal grandmother, Clara Marcum, Ashland, Kentucky; paternal grandmother, Norma Jean Massengale, Wayne County, Kentucky; aunts, Catherine (Fred) Waits, Shelbyville, Kentucky; Linda (John) Lash, Athens, Georgia; uncle, Scott Massengale, Wayne County, Kentucky; and many cousins. Her family, a host of friends, colleagues, clients, and her faithful dog companions, Bodhi and Marley, will miss her.

Memorial contributions may be made to your local animal shelter, pet charity, or allow an animal to adopt you in Jessi’s memory.

New Board Members Wanted!

2020 is an election year and we are looking for anyone interested in bringing new ideas and energy to our organization. The positions open for nominations include Pres-Elect, VP, Secretary, Treasurer, Executive VP, Oahu Reps and Kauai Rep. Please don’t be shy and contact the nominating committee for more info!

In Remembrance – Joseph Herzog

Joseph Herzog, DVM

Dr. Joseph Herzog (Wisconsin ’97), 58, Kailua, Hawaii, died April 13 , 2020 of metastatic prostate cancer. Twelve years ago, Dr. Herzog moved to Oahu when his wife became a professor in Humanities and English UH West Oahu. He first worked at VCA Family and Oahu Veterinary Specialty Center, and then moved closer to home in Kailua at Makai Animal Hospital and part-time at Surf Paws Animal Hospital in Hawaii Kai.

Dr. Herzog was deeply involved in establishing, building, teaching in, and gaining AVMA accreditation for the first and only Veterinary Technician training program and associates degree in the state. In March 2020, the program dedicated the surgery suite in his honor.

He was active in the local veterinary community and volunteered at the Hawaii Humane Society. He served on the Board of the Hawaii Veterinary Medical Association as an Oahu Representative from 2018-2020, and Conference Committee member since 2017.

Dr. Joe always said he would see anything a client could bring through the door, and he treated beloved chickens, parrots, tortoises, and the occasional pot-bellied pig and pygmy goat in clinic. However, throughout his career he also treated bigger exotics. He served as the on-call veterinarian at the Santa Barbara Zoo and San Francisco Zoo, and he was the veterinarian of record for the Sea Life Park/Mauna Lani honu breeding and release program. He always enjoyed the challenge of a new animal and facing a new disease or injury.

Dr. Herzog is survived by his wife, Brenda Machosky, mother Rose Marie Farthing, father Ernest Herzog (Terry), brother Thomas Herzog (Jeff Kaufmann), and extended family in Illinois, New York and Virginia. He was predeceased by his beloved grandmother, Stella King, and step-father Howard Farthing. He is also survived by beloved dogs Bella, Potiki, and Fenway, and cats Huika and KoaKat.

Services will be announced at a later date. There is a memorial Facebook page that all are welcome to join: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1049974025388957/

Donations: Payable to UH Foundation with memo: Dr. Herzog Vet Tech Endowment, Account #206-2860-3, mailed to Donna Gutierrez, UH Foundation, 1314 S. King Street, Suite B, Honolulu, HI 96814, or online at: www.uhfoundation.org/HonoringDrHerzog

Submitted by Brenda Machosky

Panleukopenia Cases on Oahu

In recent weeks, several veterinary practices on O’ahu have reported seeing a number of feline panleukopenia cases. Below is a link to a summary on Feline Panleukopenia provided on the AVMA website for review. Veterinarians who have had patients suspected of dying from panleukopenia can contact Dr. Aleisha Swartz for information on further confirmatory testing including necropsy and PCR at president@hawaiivetmed.org.

AVMA article on feline panleukopenia.

Article on sanitation procedures.

In Remembrance – Patrick Leadbeater

Patrick Leadbeater, DVM

The Hawaiian veterinary community has lost a familiar face and long time veterinarian in November 2019.

Dr. Patrick Leadbeater was born in 1943 in Sussex, England.  He was active in the Boy Scouts and loved the outdoors throughout his life. He graduated from the University of Guelph, Ontario Veterinary College of Veterinary College in 1974.  His first position was working with Dr. Robert Knowles in Miami, Florida. Dr. Knowles was instrumental in shaping Dr. Leadbeater’s practice.

He moved to Honolulu and worked at the the Animal Emergency Clinic which was located near the current Yanagi Sushi on Kapiolani Blvd.  He also worked as a staff veterinarian at the Honolulu Zoo.  In 1983, he opened the Veterinary Center of the Pacific on Koapaka Street near the Honolulu International Airport and continued working part-time at the Zoo.  In 1991, he purchased the Kahala Pet Hospital from Dr. Wayne Steckelberg and continued his veterinary career until late 2019.

Dr. Leadbeater was instrumental in advancing veterinary medical care in Hawaii.   He took on medical and surgical cases that other veterinarians referred to him.  This included  kidney transplants in cats, pacemaker implantation, TPLO, Total Hip Replacement surgery, and portal caval shunt implants, etc.

Submitted by Richard Fujie, DVM

HHS Spay/Neuter Clinic Tour

Take a tour of the Hawaiian Humane Society’s Community Spay/Neuter Center, which offers low-fee, high-quality, high-volume sterilizations for pet animals on Oahu.  Meet Dr. Kasey Carter,  Hawaiian Humane’s head veterinarian and learn about the services offered and the ins-and-outs of being part of a unique community program.

The tour will be on Thursday, August 29, 2019 and is open to vets and all clinic staff. Meet in the Community Spay/Neuter Center (front building off Wai’alae Ave; additional parking available in back).

Check-in and Q&A at 6:15pm. Tour from 6:30-8:00pm. Pupus & drinks (beer, wine, and non-alcoholic) provided. RSVP by August 23 to honoluluvetsociety@gmail.com.

Hawaii Pet Expo 2019

In celebration of both National Pet Week and Be Kind to Animals Week during May 5-11, 2019, the Hawaii Veterinary Medical Association proudly presents Hawaii Pet Expo 2019, to be held on Saturday and Sunday, May 11 & 12 from 10 am to 4 pm at the Neal Blaisdell Center.

Hawaii Pet Expo encourages responsible pet ownership and strengthening the unique bond between people and their pets through educational displays, live animal demonstrations, and the latest in pet products and services.

This year’s theme is “More than a Pet, More than a Friend … Family.” As always, pets are welcome. Dogs must be leashed and pets must be in good health and under their owner’s control at all times.

This event is free to the public, but donations of nonperishable food items will be accepted at the door to benefit the Hawaii Foodbank. Parking at the Neal Blaisdell Center is $6.

We are still looking for volunteers! All veterinary staff and family members are welcome to join in the fun. Sign up here.

Meet a Member – Nicole Roybal

Nicole Roybal, DVM, DACVO, is a 2007 graduate of Colorado State University and completed a rotating internship and residency at Veterinary Specialty Hospital of San Diego where she remained for 5 years as staff ophthalmologist before deciding it was time to return home to Hawaii. She grew up in Kaneohe, attended Kamehameha Schools and is honored and excited to join the local veterinary community.

She recently opened Pacific Animal Eye Care with her husband Jason Roybal. As a brand-new, family-owned and operated ophthalmology specialty practice located in Kaneohe, they are dedicated to providing excellent service as well as high-quality medicine. They offer advanced diagnostic modalities such as slit lamp biomicroscopy, indirect ophthalmoscopy, gonioscopy, rebound tonometry, ocular ultrasound exams, and electroretinography. Surgical services include phacoemulsification for cataracts, cryosurgery for abnormal cilia and neoplastic lesions, as well as a full array of microsurgical instrumentation for eyelid, corneal and intraocular procedures.

She welcomes consultations at info@pacificanimaleyecare.com or (808)445-6778. For more info, please see www.pacificanimaleyecare.com.