Hawaii Pet Expo 2019

In celebration of both National Pet Week and Be Kind to Animals Week during May 5-11, 2019, the Hawaii Veterinary Medical Association proudly presents Hawaii Pet Expo 2019, to be held on Saturday and Sunday, May 11 & 12 from 10 am to 4 pm at the Neal Blaisdell Center.

Hawaii Pet Expo encourages responsible pet ownership and strengthening the unique bond between people and their pets through educational displays, live animal demonstrations, and the latest in pet products and services.

This year’s theme is “More than a Pet, More than a Friend … Family.” As always, pets are welcome. Dogs must be leashed and pets must be in good health and under their owner’s control at all times.

This event is free to the public, but donations of nonperishable food items will be accepted at the door to benefit the Hawaii Foodbank. Parking at the Neal Blaisdell Center is $6.

We are still looking for volunteers! All veterinary staff and family members are welcome to join in the fun. Sign up here.

Meet a Member – Nicole Roybal

Nicole Roybal, DVM, DACVO, is a 2007 graduate of Colorado State University and completed a rotating internship and residency at Veterinary Specialty Hospital of San Diego where she remained for 5 years as staff ophthalmologist before deciding it was time to return home to Hawaii. She grew up in Kaneohe, attended Kamehameha Schools and is honored and excited to join the local veterinary community.

She recently opened Pacific Animal Eye Care with her husband Jason Roybal. As a brand-new, family-owned and operated ophthalmology specialty practice located in Kaneohe, they are dedicated to providing excellent service as well as high-quality medicine. They offer advanced diagnostic modalities such as slit lamp biomicroscopy, indirect ophthalmoscopy, gonioscopy, rebound tonometry, ocular ultrasound exams, and electroretinography. Surgical services include phacoemulsification for cataracts, cryosurgery for abnormal cilia and neoplastic lesions, as well as a full array of microsurgical instrumentation for eyelid, corneal and intraocular procedures.

She welcomes consultations at info@pacificanimaleyecare.com or (808)445-6778. For more info, please see www.pacificanimaleyecare.com.



Pesticides Rules Change

§4-66-54 of the Hawaii Administrative Rules is being updated by the Hawaii Department of Agriculture Pesticides branch to mandate that “every retailer that sells or distributes pesticide products to the public shall prominently post within ten feet of any pesticide product display or sales area, a warning sign that includes:

  1. Information regarding the proper handling, storage, and disposal of all pesticides sold;
  2. Emergency telephone numbers to call in case of poisoning from the pesticides; and
  3. A statement that use of any pesticide product in a manner inconsistent with its label is prohibited by law.

The warning sign shall be no less than seventeen inches by twenty two inches and contain lettering of sufficient size, no less than sixteen point bold type, which will enable the sign to be read from a distance of six feet under all lighting conditions normally encountered during business hours.”

The rules have not yet been signed as law by the governor but are expected to be signed some time in the May-June timeframe. These rules will affect
retailers that sell pesticides in any form (flea collars, topical medicine, etc.).

Sample signage wording below:

  1. For the proper handling, storage, and disposal of a pesticide product as required by Federal and State law, please refer to its label.
  2. In case of pesticide poisoning, please call the National Poison Control Center at 1-800-222-1222.
  3. It is a violation of Federal and State law to use any pesticide product in a manner inconsistent with its label.

[Pesticide product signage as required by Hawaii Administrative Rules(HAR) 4-66-54(d).]

For more information, please see the Department of Agriculture website.

Honolulu Street Dog Coalition

The Street Dog Coalition is a Colorado-based nonprofit founded by veterinarian Jon Geller whose mission is to provide free veterinary care and related services to pets of people affected by homelessness. Dr. Geller began providing care through street clinics in Ft. Collins in 2015 and has since expanded to mentor and provide supplies to licensed, volunteer veterinarians willing to lead clinics in their communities. The Street Dog Coalition partnered with the AVMA in July for a clinic at the Denver convention in July, read more about it here.

The Honolulu Street Dog Coalition clinics are led by Aleisha Swartz, DVM, and have started providing veterinary care such as vaccinations, parasite control and treatment of minor medical concerns at the new Punawai Rest Stop in Iwilei. The facility was built by the City and County of Honolulu and is a pet-friendly hygiene center where people can do laundry, take showers, receive mail and access social services.

The number of pets belonging to people affected by homelessness is unknown but is estimated to be approximately 10%. For the first time the 2019 Hawaii Homeless Point in Time Count survey asked people if they had pets; this information should be available in the spring.

If you are interested in more information on how to support this effort, volunteering at the Honolulu Clinics, or starting a clinic on a neighbor island, contact Aleisha at honolulu@thestreetdogcoalition.org. Support staff are welcome to volunteer. For more information about The Street Dog Coalition visit their website.

Rat Lungworm Disease in Hawaii

In November and December 2018, two young dogs in the Honolulu area were diagnosed with Rat Lungworm Disease, caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis. Both puppies presented with spinal hyperesthesia, hindlimb weakness, and proprioceptive ataxia. One dog had peripheral eosinophilia; all other hematology and serum biochemistry tests were unremarkable. Plain radiographs and computed tomography scans (with/without) contrast were performed but did not reveal a cause for the neurologic signs. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis in both patients revealed eosinophilic pleocytosis and real-time PCR testing for Angiostrongylus cantonensis on CSF was positive in both dogs, confirming a diagnosis of neural angiostrongylisias; PCR testing for other canine neural pathogens was negative.

Both dogs responded rapidly to treatment with corticosteroids and recovered clinically within 2 weeks. Neither dog was observed ingesting a snail or slug, but both dogs had environmental access to them. Dr. Richard Malik (University of Sydney) spoke on this topic in May 2018 and recommends treating with corticosteroids (up to 6 weeks), +/- anthelmintics (if early infection when the larvae are still small and not yet in the CNS), and pain medication or other symptomatic care as needed. He also recommends antibiotics to address the issue of translocated bacteria carried by migrating larvae.

If you have any suspected cases or have questions regarding diagnosing, treating, or preventing rat lungworm infection in dogs or other animals, please call Dr. Jenee Odani (Extension Veterinarian) at 808-956-3847 or email jsodani@hawaii.edu. She is especially interested in conducting post mortem testing on suspected cases.

Hawaii Veterinary Emergency Response

HVMA is working with the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency (HI-EMA) to support local and state disaster preparedness pertaining to animals. Would you be interested in volunteering in the event of an emergency? Would you be interested in being part of the working group developing a set of guidelines for animal care and treatment and considering the formation of a Veterinary Medical Reserve Corps or Companion Animal Response Team? Please help us gauge member interest by taking our survey below.

2018-2020 Officer Nomination Slate

HVMA Board
President-Elect: Alfred Mina
Vice Pres: Tim Falls
Secretary: Jenee Odani
Treasurer: Brenda Smith
Executive Vice President: Jill Yoshicedo
Maui County Delegate (1): Leo Murakami

Hawaii County Delegates (2): Jacob Head, open

AVMA House of Delegates

Hawaii Delegate: Leianne Lee Loy

Hawaii Alternate Delegate: Carolyn Naun

We will be holding elections during the annual business meeting on Saturday, November 10 at 12:15pm at the Hilton Waikiki Beach Hotel, 3rd floor, Prince Jonah Room. Installation of officers will be held on Sunday, November 11 at 12:15pm at the same location. You do not need to be a conference attendee to attend these meetings. Please join us!

Hawaii Rabies Quarantine Changes

Rule amendments to Chapter 4-29, HAR recently received final approval from the Governor and will become effective on August 31, 2018. A summary of the more significant changes follows. The complete Chapter 4-29, HAR with amendments is located on the Hawaii Department of Agriculture’s website at: http://hdoa.hawaii.gov/ under the Administrative Rules tab. The Animal Quarantine information page (access by clicking on the Animal Quarantine tab) has been updated and new checklists added to assist with preparing a dog or cat for the 5 Day or Less program and Direct Airport Release.

Exact Changes Made:

A. Section 4-29-2 Definitions
The definition “Service Animal” is added and the definitions of “Service Dog” and “User” are amended to reflect the definition of service animals under current Federal ADA language.

The definition “Eligibility Date” or “Eligible Date” is added for clarification of terminology and means the date determined by the State that an animal may qualify for five day or less quarantine by meeting all the specified requirements.

“Qualification date” is added for clarification and means the date determined by the state that an animal may be released from quarantine by meeting all the specified requirements under Chapter 4-29, HAR.
The definition “Safeguard” is added and means to confine and handle animals so that the animals shall not come into physical contact with any other animal, or cause a potential human exposure, at any time. The location and method of confinement and handling shall be approved by the state.

“Veterinary Hospital” is added for clarification and means an office or building designated for the sole purpose of providing veterinary examinations, diagnostics, and medical and surgical treatments of animals operated by a veterinarian licensed to practice in Hawaii.

B. Section 4-29-8.1 Other requirements
Changes are made to: Reduce the minimum time required from the most recently administered rabies vaccine before arrival in Hawaii from 90 days to 30 days;

Modify the minimum time required from a successful OIE-RVA test by reducing the period from the test before arrival in Hawaii from 120 to 30 days; and

Another amendment is added that owners are required to register their pet’s microchip number with the local county humane society or local animal welfare organization. Other changes are made throughout the section for clarification.

C. Section 4-29-8.3 Movement of dogs and cats requiring urgent diagnostic, medical or surgical procedures not available in Hawaii
A new subsection (b) is made to establish requirements for the importation of cloned animals derived from donor tissue originating in Hawaii into the state without quarantine. This provision allows application of advances in science and technology to qualify as a low risk category for import. Requirements for the cloning facility, veterinary management, brood stock, clone animal preparation, transportation and procedures are included.

J. Section 4-29-11 State animal quarantine station
Changes add that admission to the station may be denied to anyone that is not listed as an owner, co-owner, registered handler or authorized visitor on the record of an animal quarantined in the quarantine station. This change will increase biosecurity and minimize the potential of introducing diseases into the station.

An amendment is added to clarify that station veterinarians are authorized to refer an animal to a veterinary facility for diagnostics and treatment not available at the Station with or without prior owner authorization or approval. This is for situations when owners are not available and/or referral is in the best interest of the animal.

K. Section 4-29-17 Fees at the animal quarantine station.
Changes are made to fees for Five-day or less quarantine, Direct airport release, Neighbor Island Inspection Permit (NIIP) and Re-entry fee with direct airport release and ground transportation on Oahu are made. The total new fees for Five­day or less quarantine being $244 (currently $224); Direct airport release total fee of $185 (currently $165); NIIP fee of $165 (currently $145), and Reentry fee with direct airport release of $98 (currently $78).

L. Throughout Chapter 4-29, HAR, the term “service dog” is changed to “service animal” to reflect current Federal ADA language.

Read full press release here

 

ALERT: Police Impersonator Scams

Please note there have been multiple reports of a scammer calling local vets’ offices and cell phones impersonating the police. They have used the name of Captain David Chang.

The Honolulu Police Department recommends that if a veterinarian receives a phone call from a police officer to be wary and ask for their badge number and office phone number. Do not give out any personal information. Then call HPD (or your local county police department) and verify that information before returning the phone call to their office. If you suspect an impersonator, call 911 and file a police report.

Legislative Update July 2018

SB 2461

July 18, 2018
Enacted into law without Governor’s signature

This new law:

1.     Creates the offense of misrepresenting a service animal if a person knowingly misrepresents as a service animal any animal that does not meet the requirements of a service animal;

2.     Specifies that this offense is a misdemeanor punishable by no more than 6 months in jail and a fine of no less than $250 but no more than $2,000 for the second offense and each offense thereafter;

3.     Changes the term service dog to service animal; and

4.     Amends the definition of a service animal to conform with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990.

HB 2081

July 18, 2018
Signed into law

This new law:

 1.     Appropriates funds to the Department of Land and Natural Resources in order to provide assistance and additional funding to the National Wildlife Research Center of the U.S. Department of Agriculture; and

2.     Specifies that this appropriation allows the Department of Agriculture to conduct pilot field studies to evaluate control tools and develop a management plan for reducing the rose-ringed parakeet population on Kauai.