Letters to the Editor July 2018

The views and comments expressed in Letters to the Editor are those of the writer and not necessarily those of HVMA or its Board. We publish Letters to the Editor in an effort to increase communication and encourage discourse within the HVMA, and not to provide medical advice or promote any particular therapy. Please send your letters to newsletter@hawaiivetmed.org.
—-
Ihor Basko, DVM, CVA
President, Veterinary Botanical Medical Association

I am always looking for “greens” that have medicinal value to use in cat and dog recipes. Here is one new discovery for me:

A client mentioned her cat was eating this plant: Abelmoschus manihot, an Edible Hibiscus. So I checked it out. The plant comes from Southeast Asia and India and grows here like a weed. It is considered “hurricane survival food” for both the flowers (especially) and the leaves.

I have been studying some of the tropical plants here in Hawaii that are not indigenous and wondering why they are here. Someone brought them for a reason.

This plant contains quercetin and high antioxidant levels. Cats love it. It has been used to improve insulin sensitivity (anti-diabetic) and supports the kidneys and liver. I also use quercetin to treat allergies and suppress the histamine release from Mast Cells.

From the study in research gate (see link below):
– Quercetin is a potent bioflavonoid commonly found in vegetables and fruit. It is a main component of the total flavone glycosides of Flos Abelmoschus manihot, which is a common plant grown in eastern China and south-east Asia [3].
– Moreover, quercetin is a potent antioxidant that directly scavenges free radicals, inhibits xanthine oxidase and lipid peroxidation, and alters antioxidant defense pathways both in vivo and in vitro [4, 5].
– Quercetin is an efficient antioxidant that has been implicated as in inhibitor of oxidative damage in renal tubular cells and renal tissues [6].
– Hyperoside is a major pharmacologically active constituent of the flavonoid glycosides found in natural plants, and recently has attracted increasing attention due to its diverse antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, diuretic, anti-hyperglycemic, hypo-uricemic, hepatoprotective, and anti-fungal properties.

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/264430991_Prophylactic_effects_of_quercetin_and_hyperoside_in_a_calcium_oxalate_stone_forming_rat_model

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378874113000974

http://pitiesalpetriere.aphp.fr/wp-content/blogs.dir/134/files/2018/01/Chronic-Kidney-Disease-and-Flos-Abelmoschus-Manihot.pdf

https://www.ajkd.org/article/S0272-6386(14)00525-3/pdf

http://tropicalplantsociety.org/Article_5_2_2013h.html

RVT in Hawaii FAQs

WHAT DOES THIS LAW DO?
This is a title protection law only. Meaning that, as of July 1, 2018, only people who have registered with the state of Hawaii can use the title veterinary technician, vet tech, CVT, LVT, or RVT.

This includes on name tags, websites, business cards, etc. All staff members can perform the same tasks, but in order to use the title “veterinary technician”, he or she must be an RVT in the state of Hawaii.
Visit https://hvta.org/rvt-in-hi-faq/ for more details.

I AM A VETERINARIAN. WHAT DOES THIS LAW MEAN FOR ME?
For eligible employees to grandfather in, you’ll check off skills and hours on the Hawaii Experience Verification form and have it notarized. Eligible employees will need 5 years practical experience in Hawaii to sit for the Vet Tech National Exam.

Your employees can still do all the skills and tasks that they’ve been performing, but until they register in Hawaii, they cannot use the title “vet tech” or “veterinary technician”.

WANT TO HELP YOUR STAFF BECOME RVTs?
Awesome! The VTNE is a challenging exam, and you can help prepare them. Quiz them, ask them to do drug & fluid calculations, include them in your complicated cases, help pay their fees, and encourage them to attend HVTA’s study sessions.
Visit https://hvta.org/study-sessions-vtne-prep/ for more info.

THREE PATHS TO RVT
1. If already credentialed in another state: transfer VTNE scores, send license verification to DCCA.
2. If graduate of an AVMA accredited vet tech program: pass the VTNE with HI as your state.
3. Alternate Path (aka “grandfathering”): available now through July 2021 for on-the-job-trained technicians with 5+ years of experience in Hawaii, need notarized form from veterinarian, pass the VTNE with HI as your state.

For more information, see the Department of Commerce and Consumer Affairs (DCCA) Vet Tech page.

Sam Geiling, RVT
President, HVTA
Windward Community College
Kaneohe, HI

Meet Your Board: Aleisha Swartz, President-Elect

Dr. Aleisha Swartz graduated Summa Cum Laude from the University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine in 2002. After beginning her career in small animal private practice, Aleisha transitioned to shelter medicine in 2010 and since that time has worked with a variety of shelters, rescues, and spay-neuter programs.

Aleisha currently serves as the Outreach Veterinarian with the Shelter Medicine Program at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine to work with shelters across the country to increase their lifesaving capacity by supporting implementation of best practices, managing outbreaks of infectious disease, and maintaining an online resource library for shelter professionals and the public. She seeks to improve the level of care for animals in shelters and those living in the community.

Despite working for UW, Aleisha is still very happy to call Hawaii home! She enjoys working from home when not traveling and continues to pursue opportunities to make contributions locally on Oahu. Aleisha has volunteered on the board of the HVMA since 2013, serving as an Oahu delegate and Vice President in an effort to give back to the local veterinary community. As the incoming HVMA president, she hopes to find ways to add more value to membership and increase member engagement.

Legislative Update July 2018

SB 2461

July 18, 2018
Enacted into law without Governor’s signature

This new law:

1.     Creates the offense of misrepresenting a service animal if a person knowingly misrepresents as a service animal any animal that does not meet the requirements of a service animal;

2.     Specifies that this offense is a misdemeanor punishable by no more than 6 months in jail and a fine of no less than $250 but no more than $2,000 for the second offense and each offense thereafter;

3.     Changes the term service dog to service animal; and

4.     Amends the definition of a service animal to conform with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990.

HB 2081

July 18, 2018
Signed into law

This new law:

 1.     Appropriates funds to the Department of Land and Natural Resources in order to provide assistance and additional funding to the National Wildlife Research Center of the U.S. Department of Agriculture; and

2.     Specifies that this appropriation allows the Department of Agriculture to conduct pilot field studies to evaluate control tools and develop a management plan for reducing the rose-ringed parakeet population on Kauai.

AVMA Update July 2018

Aloha and Greetings from Denver Colorado, the location for the 2018 AVMA House of Delegates Summer Session (July 12-13) and AVMA Convention (July 13-17).

The House of Delegates (HOD) is the principal body within the Association
responsible for establishing policy and providing direction for matters relating to veterinary medicine. The House of Delegates consist of one (1) Delegate and one (1) Alternate Delegate appointed by veterinary organizations as stated in the HOD By-Laws.

For the past 27 years, Cordell Chang has been the Hawaii Veterinary Medical
Association member to the House of Delegates. This year, 2018, Cordell will
retire as a Delegate. To honor him for his years of service, the AVMA chose him to give the Invocation to this years HOD meeting. Due to family
responsibilities, he was not able to attend. It was my honor to read his Invocation to the Delegates. Cordell has been a shining light and a personal mentor for me, and like so many of the members have commented, “We will truly miss Cordell!”

This year’s agenda included the following topics (and their action items):

Dog Devocalization
– A proposal to express more forceful opposition to debarking was turned down and was then voted to refer the proposal back to the AVMA Board of Directors for reconsideration. The Association’s current policy states that debarking should be used only as an alternative to euthanasia, after efforts to change a dog’s behavior have failed.

Breeding Guidelines – The AVMA House Of Delegates voted for the AVMA to collaborate with others, such as American Kennel Club and Cat Fanciers, on breeding practices and guidelines to minimize inherited disorders in dogs and cats.

Foot and Mouth Disease – Support of a vaccination policy and recommendations on laboratory testing, preparedness activities and messaging. Action: Approval by House of Delegates.

License Portability – What is the need and what are the possible avenues for veterinarians to move across jurisdictions for temporary relief and disaster response? Recommendation from HOD: No action at this time.

Student Debt – Think outside the box. What hasn’t been tried?
Recommendations from HOD:
– Board of Directors investigate methods to make available financial advisor(s) to help veterinary applicants, students, and recent graduates manage the cost of education.
– AVMA investigate and promote strategies for private practitioners to assist students and recent graduates in managing the cost of their education. dents that is financially sustainable for the AVMA.
– AVMA investigate the development of a low interest loan program for veterinary students that is financially sustainable for the AVMA
– AVMA develop a toolbox of advocacy strategies to assist state VMAs to promote increased funding for higher education and loan repayment programs.

Globalization – What role should the AVMA play internationally?
The AVMA staff will create a communication plan for educating AVMA members about its current international activities, develop tools to assess member interest in personal involvement in international initiatives and global volunteer opportunities, and explore international AVMA membership category models.

If anyone would like to discuss more of the above topics or HOD, please feel free to contact me through the HVMA website.

After two days of House of Delegate responsibilities it was now time to learn
(many hours of CE available), socialize (attend a Colorado Rockies Baseball
game), network (Alumni receptions), and be empowered through the words of Keynote speaker Shiza Shaid and participate in community service – Street Dog Clinic (caring for the dogs/cats belonging to the homeless). It was great to see many Hawaii Colleagues participate in this year’s conference entitled “Elevate Your Passion”.

I invite you to the 2019 AVMA Conference in Washington D.C. August 2-9!

Aloha!
Leianne K. Lee Loy, DVM
Hawaii Alternate Delegate for AVMA

Message from the President Vol 3, 2018

Aloha HVMA Members!

We are excited to announce registration is open for our 65th Annual HVMA Conference, which will be held from November 8-11, 2018 at the Hilton Waikiki Beach Hotel. This year we are offering RACE-approved CE (up to 30 credits for vets and 16 credits for vet techs) and bringing in world-renowned speakers covering a variety of topics including Fear Free experts Marty Becker and Gary Landsberg, emergency medicine specialist Tim Hackett, exotics specialist Joerg Mayer, and disaster medicine expert Debra Zoran.

Our wet lab offerings include four different orthopedic labs by Brian Beale and Don Hulse, advanced dental extraction labs by Kevin Stepaniuk, and a cat behavior lab by Karen Sueda. Please see our complete conference schedule at: https://hawaiivetmed.org/2018conference/schedule/.

During our conference we will hold our annual HVMA business meeting on Saturday November 10 at 12:15pm. You do not need to be a conference attendee to come to the business meeting. During the meeting, we will be voting on the 2018-2020 officer positions as well as a few proposed bylaw changes. If you are interested in putting your name on the ballot, please email us.

Also on Saturday November 10 from 6-8pm we will be hosting our annual social cocktail party and sharing some Hawaiian paniolo culture with our Japanese and international guests. Tickets to this event are $60 or complimentary with conference registration.

Register online for early bird pricing by September 15th. Remember to log in to your HVMA online account to register at the reduced member rates. If you have forgotten to renew your membership for 2018, it’s not too late!

Thank you to those who generously volunteered their time and energy toward making the 2018 Pet Expo another success. We are always looking for volunteers for the conference and other HVMA activities. Please send your ideas, feedback, and questions to contact@hawaiivetmed.org.

Aloha,
Jill Yoshicedo, DVM
President, Hawaii Veterinary Medical Association

AVMF Extends Disaster Relief to Hawaii Veterinarians

AVMF Disaster Relief and Reimbursement Grants

 The American Veterinary Medical Foundation (AVMF) provides two grant programs to help veterinarians and the animals they care for during times of disaster. Grants are available to support victims of hurricanes, floods, tornadoes, earthquakes, volcanoes, wildfires or oil spills.

 Disaster Reimbursement Grants for Veterinary Medical Care

Purpose: The AVMF disaster reimbursement grants are for the purpose of ensuring the emergency veterinary medical care of animal victims of disaster.

 Awards: Up to $5,000 may be issued per grantee for out-of-pocket expenses incurred by veterinarians providing emergency veterinary medical care to animal victims of disasters.  AVMF reimburses for the actual cost of medical supplies purchased directly from a vendor. Modest boarding costs may also be covered. 

Disaster Relief Grant for Veterinarians

Purpose: The AVMF disaster relief grants are for the purpose of assisting veterinarians who have experienced an emergency need for basic necessities due to a disaster. The grants would cover items such as clothing, temporary housing, transportation and meals that were needed immediately following a disaster.

 Awards: Up to $2,000 may be issued per grantee for out-of-pocket expenses incurred immediately following a disaster. AVMF reimburses for the actual cost of items purchased directly from a vendor. Modest housing costs may be covered for emergency temporary shelter.

 Application Procedure

The applications are posted on the AVMF website. Applicants should follow the online directions for submitting the application and the expense chart. Limited funds are currently available and approved on a first come, first served basis.

Deadline:  Applications must be received no later than 120 days following the disaster.

 More Information: Please contact Cheri Kowal, Senior Manager, Programs and Operations, 847-285-6691 or CKowal@AVMA.org

Veterinarian Mental Health Research Study

HVMA members are invited to participate in a research study about mental health experiences and attitudes toward seeking mental health services among veterinary professionals. This study is being conducted by Kerry Karaffa, PhD and Tamara Hancock, DVM, MS, DACVP, PhD. Dr. Karaffa is a licensed psychologist and Mental Health and Wellness Coordinator for the University of Missouri College of Veterinary Medicine, and Dr. Hancock is a veterinarian and Assistant Teaching Professor at the University of Missouri. This study will provide information that may ultimately be used to better understand mental health concerns and barriers to seeking mental health services among veterinary professionals.

Participation involves completing a 100-item electronic survey about your personal mental health experiences and your attitudes and perceptions about mental health services, including potential barriers to seeking services. The survey will take approximately 20 minutes to complete. Participation is voluntary and there are no direct incentives for participating in the study. However, information gained during the study may help improve mental health services for veterinary professionals. You may choose not to participate or discontinue participation at any time without consequence.

Due to the personal nature of some of the questions and to encourage honest responses, you will not be asked to provide your name or employment affiliation. Computer IP addresses will not be collected, and any demographic information (such as your age, ethnicity, or years in practice) will be presented in summary form when findings are reported. The data will be password-protected, and only the researchers and individuals responsible for research oversight at the University of Missouri Institutional Review Board will have access to the records.

Completing the survey may produce minor discomfort as you reflect about your mental health experiences. Otherwise, there are no risks involved in participating in the study in excess of those you would experience in everyday life. Your participation in this study will not affect any professional opportunities.

Your consent to participate is granted by selecting that you are over 18 years old, and by acknowledging that you have been fully informed about the procedures listed here, and you are aware of what you will be asked to do and the benefits and risks of participation. If you have any questions or concerns about this study you may contact the researchers. If you would like a copy of the results of this study, please contact the researchers and arrangements will be made.

Kerry M. Karaffa, Ph.D.
Licensed Psychologist
University of Missouri College of Veterinary Medicine
1600 Rollins Rd, Columbia, MO 65211
Email: karaffak@missouri.edu
Phone: (573) 882-4629
Fax: (573) 884-9607

Tamara S. Hancock, DVM, MS, DACVP, PhD
Assistant Teaching Professor
University of Missouri College of Veterinary Medicine
1600 Rollins Rd, Columbia, MO 65211
Email: hancockts@missouri.edu
Phone: (515) 771-9376

If you have any questions regarding your rights as a participant in this research and/or concerns about the study, or if you feel under any pressure to enroll or to continue to participate in this study, you may contact the University of Missouri Institutional Review Board (which is a group of people who review the research studies to protect participants’ rights) at (573) 882-3181 or irb@missouri.edu.

If you would like to participate in this study, please select the link provided below:

https://missouri.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_6GaGzJvZKyQkSe9

2018 Legislative Session

Legislative Update 2018 Session

Bill Summary Status
HB2498 Establishes and appropriates funds for one full-time equivalent permanent veterinary medical officer position within the Department of Health. HVMA SUPPORTS. Failed in Senate
HB1823 Defines emotional support animals and makes it a misdemeanor to knowingly make a misrepresentation regarding a service dog or emotional support animal. Failed in House
HB2060 Removes the word “Examiners” from the names of the State Board of Chiropractic Examiners, Board of Dental Examiners, Board of Examiners in Optometry, and Board of Veterinary Examiners. Renames the boards with titles that more accurately reflect their scope and duties. HVMA defers to BVE stance. Failed in Conference Committee
HB2081
SB2566
Appropriates funds to the Department of Land and Natural Resources to provide assistance and supplemental funding to the National Wildlife Research Center of the U.S. Department of Agriculture to conduct pilot field studies to evaluate control tools and develop a management plan to reduce the rose-ringed parakeet population on Kauai. Passed;
Sent to Governor
HB2270
SB2501
Requires the Department of Human Services to establish ohana zones where homeless persons may reside. Appropriates funds. Failed
SB2014 Requires persons convicted of animal cruelty to register with the attorney general. Requires animal shelters, animal breeders, and pet stores to check whether an individual has been convicted of animal abuse when the individual applies to work or volunteer, or purchases or adopts an animal. Establishes penalties. Prevents persons convicted of animal cruelty from possessing, owning, or working in close proximity to animals. Requires police officers to be trained in identifying and investigating animal abuse. Failed in Senate
SB2289 Establishes the offense of sexual assault of an animal. Provides for impoundment and forfeiture of a sexually assaulted animal. Not heard
SB2435
HB2593
Requires the Department of Health to contract with a nonprofit animal rescue group to oversee caretakers of feral cats. Exempts registered caretakers of feral cats from state laws and county ordinances relating to the feeding and confinement of cats. Establishes a trap-sterilize-return process. Failed
SB2461 Establishes the offense of “misrepresentation of a service animal”. Changes the term “service dog” to “service animal” and amends the definition of that term to conform with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 Passed; Signed into law by Governor
SB2929 Establishes the Hawaii spay/neuter council to be administratively attached to the department of Commerce and Consumer Affairs. Establishes the Hawaii spay/neuter special fund. Imposes a fee on pet food to support the Hawaii spay/neuter grant program to spay and neuter dogs and cats. Makes an appropriation. Not heard
HB2072 Prohibits certain restraints and tethers that endanger, or deny sustenance, to a dog. Adjusted penalties. Failed in Conference Committee
SB2260 Requires veterinarians, upon request of the owner of an animal, to make available a copy of any prescription that the veterinarian has previously prescribed the animal free of charge. HVMA OPPOSED. Deferred by Senate

Updated May 2018

RVT in Hawaii Meeting May 15, 2018

The Hawaii Veterinary Technician Association (HVTA) is holding a general meeting on Tuesday, May 15, 2018, to discuss RVT in Hawaii, the application, and the grandfathering process. Members and non-members are invited to attend. Please RSVP by May 10th to hvta.info@gmail.com. The meeting will be held at the Kalihi-Palama Library.

Senate Bill 2671 passed in 2016 which set the following requirements to qualify as a veterinary technician in Hawaii:

  1. Be at least 18 years of age
  2. Have successfully passed the Veterinary Technican National Examination
  3. Meets at least ONE of the following conditions:
    1. Has successfully completed a course of study at a program for veterinary technology accredited by the AVMA committee on Veterinary Technician Education and Activities;
    2. Be licensed, certified, or registered veterinary technician in good standing in another state having standards for registration comparable to those in this State; or
    3. Prior to July 1, 2021, submits a notarized document from an employer who is a licensed veterinarian and who certifies that applicant has five or more years of practical experience in Hawaii; provided that no reciprocity shall be given for practical experience gained outside of the State.

Information for licensing in Hawaii can be found on the Department of Commerce and Consumer Affairs Professional and Vocational Licensing website. Additional information can be found at the HVTA website. Information about the VTNE can be found here.

Addendum May 26, 2018: Hawaii RVT application online here.